British Nursing News Nursing Agencies List - The No.1 Online Directory for Nursing Agencies
  WWW.BNN-ONLINE.CO.UK       Monday, 18 November 2019 
Search stories for:
Sample search for:

News Archives, December 2005
Saturday, 24 December 2005 10:04
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Surgery gives Amber her smile back
Doctors at St Thomas’ Hospital, London have given Amber Sisson a 10-year-old girl her smile back after a life-changing brain operation just in time for Christmas.

Amber suffers from a rare genetic disorder that causes contortions and involuntary movements. The condition, known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease, is progressive and crippling.

Just over two weeks ago Amber's body was in a state of permanent spasm. Her head was thrown back and her face distorted, turning smiles into grimaces.

When she tried to move, her arms would flail, causing her to strike her forehead repeatedly. She could not stand on her own, speak coherently, dress or feed herself.

But Amber was suitable for a radical form of treatment known as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS).

Already used to help sufferers of Parkinson's disease, it involves inserting electrodes deep into the brain.

A small current delivered through wires hidden under the skin effectively jams unwanted brain signals to stop the spasms.

Three days after the operation, Amber had undergone a transformation which astonished the medical team caring for her at the hospital and delighted her parents.

Speaking at the new Evelina Children's Hospital at St Thomas's, her mother, Amanda, 34, from Nottingham, said: "Amber has always been such a happy little girl and so fun loving. She used to go to ballet school and swim, and she loves to draw and paint.

"When this happened we were absolutely heartbroken, devastated. But we just had to accept it and carry on, and be strong for her.

"Now she can paint pictures, sit up in bed, put her socks on, and feed herself. It's fantastic, a miracle - the best Christmas present I've ever had. I don't want anything else, ever".

Dr Jean-Pierre Lin, the paediatric neurologist in charge of Amber's treatment, was amazed at the success of the operation.

"I think it's spectacular," he said. "It's not miraculous, because it's the result of human intervention and ingenuity, but it is very dramatic. This is a very early beginning, but a very promising start. It's more than we had hoped for”.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Saturday, 24 December 2005 09:53
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Christmas appeal for bone marrow donors
The Anthony Nolan Trust a bone marrow register charity have launched a Christmas appeal for bone marrow donors to help 7,000 people worldwide whose lives could be saved.

The Trust is seeking people aged 18 to 40 to join its register, particularly young men and people from ethnic minorities.

Alex Frazier, spokesman for the trust said yesterday: "Medical treatment can cure these patients, but success is not assured. A bone marrow transplant may be the last chance to save their life”.

Since 1974, the Anthony Nolan Trust has saved the lives of more than 4,000 people. To join the register call 0901 8822234 or visit: www.anthonynolan.org.uk.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 12:08
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Didgeridoo playing improves your sleep, study finds
Regular didgeridoo playing can reduce snoring and daytime sleepiness, a study published online by the British Medical Journal has suggested.

Snoring and obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome are common sleep disorders caused by the collapse of the upper airways. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy is effective, but is not suitable for many patients.

Reports of didgeridoo players experiencing reduced daytime sleepiness and snoring after practising, led experts in Switzerland to test the theory that training of the upper airways by didgeridoo playing can improve these disorders.

They identified 25 patients with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and who complained about snoring. Patients were randomly allocated to an intervention group, which involved didgeridoo lessons and daily practice at home for four months, or a control group, which remained on a waiting list for lessons.

Compared with the control group, daytime sleepiness and apnoea scores improved significantly in the didgeridoo group. Partners of patients in the didgeridoo group also reported much less sleep disturbance.

Although overall quality of sleep did not differ significantly between groups, a combined analysis of sleep related measures showed a moderate to large effect of didgeridoo playing.

The researchers found that regular training of the upper airways by didgeridoo playing reduces daytime sleepiness and snoring in people with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and also improves the sleep quality of partners.

“Larger trials are needed to confirm our preliminary findings, but our results may give hope to the many people with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and snoring, as well as to their partners,” they said.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 12:00
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Harry Potter protects children from injury
Harry Potter books seem to protect children from traumatic injuries, according to a study in this week’s British Medical Journal.

Injuries caused by “craze” activities such as inline skating and microscooters have previously been reported. One modern craze is the Harry Potter series of books and films.

Given the lack of horizontal velocity, height, wheels, or sharp edges associated with this particular craze, researchers at the John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford investigated the impact of these books on children’s traumatic injuries during the peak of their use.

They reviewed all children aged 7-15 who attended their emergency department with musculoskeletal injuries over the summer weekends of 2003-5.

The launch dates of the two most recent Harry Potter books (The Order of the Phoenix and The Half-Blood Prince) were Saturday 21 June 2003 and Saturday 16 July 2005. They compared the numbers of admissions for these weekends (intervention weekends) with those for summer weekends in previous years (control weekends).

The average attendance rate during the control weekends was 67, while for the two intervention weekends, the attendance rates were 36 and 37. At no other point during the three year surveillance period was attendance that low. MetOffice data obtained for each of the weekends suggested no confounding effect of weather conditions.

“We observed a significant fall in the numbers of attendees to the emergency department on the weekends that the two most recent Harry Potter books were released,” say the authors.

Both these weekends were in mid-summer with good weather, suggesting that there is a place for a committee of safety conscious, talented writers who could produce high quality books for the purpose of injury prevention.

Potential problems with this project would include an unpredictable increase in childhood obesity, rickets, and loss of cardiovascular fitness, they conclude.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 11:56
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Radiotherapy could reduce breast cancer recurrence by two thirds
Health experts have recommended that women with breast cancer be given radiotherapy as part of their treatment after NHS Quality Improvement Scotland revealed evidence that the procedure could help to reduce the risk of recurrence by two thirds.

The NHS QIS guidelines also recommend that chemotherapy should be considered for all women under the age of 70 with early stage breast cancer.

In incurable cases, patients should be treated by highly trained “palliative staff”, they say.

Lorraine Dallas, of Breast Cancer Care Scotland, said more resources were needed for radiotherapy in order to reduce waiting times.

She said: "Breast Cancer Care still has concerns in some areas of the country that there are delays in radiotherapy, and this can be a huge emotional stress on people.

"The guidelines act as a lever to ensure that where there are concerns that practice is not up to standard, resources are allocated to ensure guidelines are properly implemented."

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 11:00
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Health officials issue malaria warning
The Health Protection Agency has made renewed appeals for people travelling to malaria-infected areas to ensure they take medication after three more people from Britain were diagnosed with the illness.

Nine people have been infected since mid-November, of whom none had followed medical advice to take anti-malarial medication, officials said. Two people returning from Gambia died.

The HPA said people must take the tablets before travelling, while abroad and after returning to ensure being protected.

The number of Britons returning from abroad with falciparum malaria, the most severe for of the disease, has risen from about 250 in 1977 to around 1,500 annually in recent years.

Professor Peter Chiodini, a malaria expert from the HPA, said: "We are strongly urging British travellers heading to malarious destinations, such as The Gambia, to seek pre-travel medical advice and to take the anti-malarial medication that they should be prescribed prior to, during and after their trip.

"We are issuing this further warning following recent reports of another three cases of falciparum malaria in returning travellers."

He added: "Malaria is a preventable disease but since November we have been made aware of nine cases, including two fatalities, in returning travellers.

"We ask that travellers also avoid mosquito bites by wearing insect repellent and cover-up clothing and sleep under an insecticide-treated net in conjunction with taking anti-malarial medication to ensuring they adequately protect themselves against the disease."

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 10:48
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Stem cell professor faked cloning evidence
Pioneering research into human cloning, carried out earlier this year by one of South Korea’s top scientists, was fabricated, a council of experts has concluded.

The Soul National University panel said the work by world-renowned Hwang Woo-Suk was “intentionally fabricated”.

Dr Hwang refuted the ruling but said he would now resign.

"I sincerely apologise to the people for creating shock and disappointment," he said. "As a symbol of apology, I step down as professor of Seoul National University."

But he added: "I emphasise that patient-specific stem cells belong to South Korea and you are going to see this."

Dr Hwang created news around the world when he announced in August that his team had created the first cloned dog.

That claim, as well as an earlier paper on the first cloning of a human embryo, will now be reviewed by the same panel, the BBC News website reports.

In May, Dr Hwang said his team had extracted embryonic material that exactly matched the DNA of 11 patients. However, the panel said the 11 sets of data were derived from only two stem cell lines and was unsure whether those two lines had been cloned.

"Based on these findings, data in the 2005 Science journal cannot be regarded as a simple accidental error but as intentional fabrication made out of two stem cells," the investigators said.

"This is a serious wrongdoing that has damaged the foundation of science," they added.

Roh Jung-hye, the university's dean of research affairs, told a news conference: "Professor Hwang admitted to having played a role in extending the data of the two stem cell lines to those of 11 stem cells."

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 10:23
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Soaps unrealistic over coma patients
Glossy television dramas give viewers an unrealistic impression of coma patients’ survival and recovery rates, experts have warned.

Tracking soap opera storylines containing coma patients over 10 years, researchers found they were far more likely to survive a coma than in real life. And they were also much more likely to emerge unscathed.

For Instance, only 8 per cent of soap opera patients died during coma, compared with more than 50 per cent in real life.

And all those who did survive recovered fully from their comas, while realistically just one in ten would regain their previous health - usually after months of intense rehabilitation, the authors said.

Such unrealistic outcomes have implications for viewers’ expectations when dealing with family members or partners in comas, or if recovering from comas themselves.

Television storylines have substantial influence on viewers, the report in this week’s British Medical Journal said. American soaps reach 40 million viewers in the US alone and are broadcast in 90 countries worldwide - a huge audience for convincing health messages.

Although families of coma patients are not often faced with decisions over life-sustaining treatment, when needed such decisions are difficult and shrouded in uncertainty, the authors said.

It may not be helpful to have unrealistic expectations of a patient’s survival - leading to disagreements between doctors and families which often end up in the courts.

While soap storylines are not written to reflect real life, the authors called on the media to balance stories of improbable survival and recovery with compelling and compassionate stories of characters who die with comfort and dignity.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 10:13
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Hangover cures don’t work
No compelling evidence exists to suggest that any complementary or conventional intervention is effective for treating or preventing alcohol hangover, this week’s British Medical Journal has reported.

In Britain, alcohol hangovers account for about £2bn in lost wages each year, mostly due to sickness absence, and a variety of “hangover cures” are available.

Researchers searched medical databases and the internet, and contacted experts and manufacturers for randomised controlled trials of any medical intervention for preventing or treating alcohol hangover.

They found eight trials testing eight different agents: propranolol (beta-blocking drug), tropisetron (drug for nausea and vertigo), tolfenamic acid (painkiller), fructose or glucose, and the dietary supplements borage, artichoke, prickly pear, and a yeast based preparation.

Most trials reported no beneficial effects, although encouraging findings existed for borage, a yeast based preparation, and tolfenamic acid.

“We are confident that our search strategy located all published trials on the subject,” say the authors. “Our findings show no compelling evidence to suggest that any complementary or conventional intervention is effective for treating or preventing the alcohol hangover.”

The most effective way to avoid the symptoms of alcohol induced hangover is to practise abstinence or moderation, they conclude.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Friday, 23 December 2005 09:18
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Regular didgeridoo playing reduces snoring and daytime sleepiness
A study published in the online British Medical Journal claims that regular didgeridoo playing reduces snoring and daytime sleepiness.

Researchers from Switzerland have found that snorers and patients with sleep disorders improved after a four-month trial playing the Australian instrument.

They identified 25 patients with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and who complained about snoring. Patients were randomly allocated to an intervention group (didgeridoo lessons and daily practice at home for four months) or a control group (remained on a waiting list for lessons).

Compared with the control group, daytime sleepiness and apnoea scores improved significantly in the didgeridoo group. Partners of patients in the didgeridoo group also reported much less sleep disturbance.

Although overall quality of sleep did not differ significantly between groups, a combined analysis of sleep related measures showed a moderate to large effect of didgeridoo playing.

The authors conclude that regular training of the upper airways by didgeridoo playing reduces daytime sleepiness and snoring in people with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and also improves the sleep quality of partners.

“Larger trials are needed to confirm our preliminary findings, but our results may give hope to the many people with moderate obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and snoring, as well as to their partners,” they say.

- add your comments to this story

Sponsored by The Nursing Portal Top Of Page
Latest News Stories 3 4 5 6 7  Previous News Stories

Home   Top   Disclaimer    Site Credits

Nursing Jobs | Just for Nurses | Nursing Agencies List | Charles Bloe Training
Nursing Portal | Nursing Events | Brutish Nursing | British Nursing Websites
Website Development and SEO Services

 

NHS Discounts
KEY WORKERS ARE PRICED OUT OF HOMES
DIET 'AFFECTS ARTERIES OF FOETUS'
BOOST FOR CERVICAL CANCER
ONE IN 20 VIOLENT CRIMES COMMITTED BY MENTALLY ILL
FISH OIL 'AIDS WEIGHT LOSS' WITHOUT DIET
STAFFS MAY STRIKE OVER HEAT
BEAT A FAG WITH A JAG
ALCOHOL KILLS RECORD NUMBER OF WOMEN IN SCOTLAND
FORMER PRESIDENT URGES GMC REMODELLING
DARK SKIN 'DOES NOT BLOCK CANCER'
Nurses Reconnected

   UK Nursing. Copyright, Design and Content, © 1999 - 2019. All rights reserved Back To Top Of Page
Click here if you need to advertise to nurses