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News Archives, October 2004
Sunday, 31 October 2004 10:38
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Fears for health service as More nurses quit NHS to work in America
A report by The Royal College of Nursing (RCN), has revealed that the number of nurses who left the UK to work in America more than doubled last year, prompting concerns of an impending exodus and deterioration in patient care.

The report shows a record number of nurses left Britain last year to work abroad, lured by huge pay rises, bonuses and improved living and working conditions.

Beverly Malone, general secretary of the RCN, said the increase over one year was striking and, if sustained, could lead to deterioration in patient care in Britain.

The figures have been released ahead of the college's annual report into the state of nursing, due out on Monday.
   

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Saturday, 30 October 2004 12:29
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Power cables double the risk of cancer in children
Children living near high-voltage power cables may have double the risk of contracting cancer.

The Childhood Cancer Research Group at Oxford University studied 70,000 children under 15 for the Department of Health report, half of whom had cancer.

Researchers concluded that, for a small number, high-voltage electricity may have been a factor. Gerald Draper, lead author of the research, told The Times the findings had been a surprise, although he said other factors, including chance, could account for them.

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Saturday, 30 October 2004 12:21
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Children's tooth decay at its best
New figures by the 2003 British Dental Survey, released by the Office for National Statistics, shows that tooth decay among children is at its lowest recorded level since 1983.

The biggest fall was among 15-year-olds with only 13% suffering from decay, compared with 42% in 1983.

It also showed that teenage boys are more likely to suffer from plaque and gum disease than girls. It found 68% of 15-year-old boys had some plaque, compared to 57% of 15-year-old girls; while 56% of 15-year-old boys had some gingivitis, compared to 48% of girls.

The survey also discovered variations across the UK, with Northern Ireland having the highest level of tooth decay among children.

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Saturday, 30 October 2004 12:07
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
'Safer' breast implant with a more natural look
AorTech, a Scottish company based in Bellshill is set to start testing a “next generation” breast implant made of ultra-tough but highly malleable plastic.

The gel substance, called Elast-Eon, could provide the quarter of a million women in the USA and Europe who have breast surgery every year with a safer and more natural implant.

Frank Maguire, AorTech’s chief executive, said: "Our fundamental proposition is we can develop a much safer product which is twice as strong as silicon and has a barrier property that is up to 100 times greater than silicon to prevent leakages. We believe Elast-Eon would be a very safe material to use in breast implants”.

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Saturday, 30 October 2004 11:53
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
drop in scottish heart and stroke deaths
Annual statistics issued yesterday by the NHS showed that fewer Scots are dying from heart disease and strokes.

Andy Kerr, the Health Minister, welcomed the fall, but said that more work was needed to improve Scotland’s poor health record.

Mr Kerr said: “Many Scots are at risk of both conditions because of poor diet and lack of exercise. Smoking rates in Scotland are still sky high and alcohol misuse is also a serious risk factor”.

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Saturday, 30 October 2004 11:30
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
FEARS of EU HEALTH RULES
The British Medical Association (BMA) said it had serious concerns that patients could be put at risk by new proposals from the European Union (EU).

At present, each member state regulates their own health care system, setting standards, clinical guidelines and rules on qualifications for doctors.

The BMA said that whereas at present, doctors working in the UK are regulated by the General Medical Council, under the EU proposals a doctor working in the UK who had qualified in another EU country would effectively be regulated by their home country.

Dr Edwin Borman, head of the BMA's international committee, said: "These new proposals undermine each member state's ability to decide what is in the best interests of its patients and its healthcare systems”.

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Friday, 29 October 2004 12:12
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Smaller pill packs law has CUT SUICIDES
Oxford University researchers suggest that selling paracetamol and other painkillers in smaller pack sizes has slashed suicide rates, which has been reported in the British Medical Journal.

Almost 25% fewer people took fatal aspirin and paracetamol overdoses in the three years after 1998 than before.

Sue Simkin, senior researcher at the Centre for Suicide Research at the University of Oxford, said: "Legislation restricting pack sizes of analgesics in the United Kingdom has been beneficial.

"A further reduction in pack sizes could prevent more deaths”.

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Friday, 29 October 2004 11:52
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
mums to be fear that prozac may harm unborn children
US scientists have told the journal of Science that using the anti-depressant Prozac at an early age could lead to emotional problems later in life; also pregnant women may be risking the mental health of their unborn child by using the drug.

The team at Columbia University in New York found young mice that were given the drug grew up anxious and appeared depressed in tests on their emotional state.

They believe the Selective Serotonin Re-uptake Inhibitor (SSRI) drug interferes with a critical stage of brain development, setting the animals up for emotional disorders later in life.

But Prozac's makers said care should be taken when interpreting rodent studies.

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Friday, 29 October 2004 11:37
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
SCANDAL of 83-week wait for ent APPOINTMENT
MSPs heard that a woman has been told she will have to wait 83 weeks for a routine hospital appointment at Lothian University Hospitals ENT department.

Mr Pringle, MSP for Edinburgh South, told reporters that the woman, whom he did not identify, had been waiting since last year for what was described as a routine ear appointment. In March last year she was told she would have to wait 40 weeks, in April this year it had increased to 68 weeks, and she was recently told it had gone up to 83 weeks.

Andy Kerr, Scotland’s Health Minister, said that he shared the “frustration” voiced by Mr Pringle, but he said improvements were under way to tackle ear, nose and throat (ENT) waiting times in the capital.

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Friday, 29 October 2004 11:13
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Attacks on NHS staff higher than previously thought
Staff absence in the NHS in Scotland is higher than previously thought with the average worker taking an estimated 11.7 days off sick a year.

Violence and aggression is said to be the major reason for staff calling in sick, according to figures compiled by ISD Scotland.

Unions and opposition politicians are calling for urgent measures to protect staff.

Royal College of Nursing Scotland director James Kennedy said: 'It should be a fundamental right of all NHS staff to work in a safe and healthy environment'.

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