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News Archives, January 2005
Monday, 31 January 2005 15:37
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
MONDAYS DAY OF STRESS
A Tokyo Women's Medical University study claims that blood pressure is higher on Monday morning than any other day.

It may explain why the stress of going back to work puts the cardiovascular system under increased pressure.

Dr Shuogo Murakami, who led the research said;

“Most people are free of the mental and physical burdens of work on a Sunday and experience a more stressful change from weekend leisure activities to work activities on Mondays.

“There was a distinct peak on Mondays in this study”.

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Monday, 31 January 2005 10:56
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Nicotine Patches for Scots Teenagers
The £180,000 lottery-funded pilot scheme is to give nicotine patches and gum to teenagers in a bid to stop underage smoking. The schoolchildren will also be trained to counsel each other.

The scheme is to be launched in Lanarkshire, Scotland, where almost half of cancer deaths are linked to smoking.

Prof Ian Stolerman, a nicotine expert from the Institute of Psychiatry at Kings College, London, said: "NRT poses a much greater risk for children than for adults.Children are much more susceptible to becoming dependent upon nicotine, so great care is needed in prescribing treatments."

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Monday, 31 January 2005 10:39
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Co-proxamol Being Phased Out
The popular pain-killer Co-proxamol is to be phased out with immediate effect.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency banned the drug because of the high number of deaths associated with it.

It is a very effective suicide drug but it is also all to easy to take an accidental overdose. Taking only a couple of extra tablets can affect the cardio-vascular and respiratory systems leading to cardiac and respiratory arrest.

Patients taking the drug are advised to consult their GP when their next prescription is due. Co-proxamol will no longer be available within 18 months time.

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Monday, 31 January 2005 10:10
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Motor Neurone Disease Breakthrough
Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have taken a step forward in the search for a cure for motor neurone disease.

The researchers have grown motor neurones from human embryo stem cells. They hope that some time in the future these cloned cells can repair the damaged motor neurones, reversing the effects of the fatal disease.

Researchers at the Roslin Institute in Scotland have applied for a licence to clone cells from motor neurone sufferers.

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Sunday, 30 January 2005 10:06
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Where have our nurses gone
Unions have warned that the NHS is facing a recruitment crisis, with more than 60 per cent of registered nurses aged over-40.

Out of the country's 660,000 nurses, one-third is aged 40-49, 12 per cent are 50-54 and 16 per cent are over-55.

Unions have also warned that thousands will soon be eligible to retire but there is a lack of younger nurses to replace them.

Dave Prentis, leader of public services union Unison, said: "More incentives are needed to encourage younger nurses to the profession”.

A Health Service spokesman said: "Our new deal for nurses will attract younger entrants.

"The salary for a newly-qualified nurse is over £18,000 - a 52 per cent increase on the 1997 wage level”.
   

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Sunday, 30 January 2005 09:54
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Scientists battle to reverse eye disease
Experiments carried out by researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Manchester claim to have found how to make eye cells sensitive to light, opening new ways to treat some forms of blindness.

The researchers found that activating a protein called melanopsin made other cells in the retina sensitive to light.

Professor Ron Douglas of City University in London said: "Much effort is being put into both retinal transplants and even electronic light-sensitive implants.

"However, both approaches are a long way from being clinically effective and they may never be so.

"The current research suggests another possible line of therapy. The resulting 'vision' may well be little more than black and white light sensitivity, but it would be a start”.

Professor Chris Inglehearn, professor of molecular ophthalmology at Leeds University, said: "This is highly significant. They are getting at the primary process of what makes a cell sensitive to light”.

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Sunday, 30 January 2005 09:45
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Could Cannabis be linked to mental illness
Charity Rethink campaigners are calling for an urgent government inquiry into links between the use of cannabis and mental illness.

The call comes after the Home Office reclassified cannabis from a class B to class C drug.

Doug Naysmith, member of the Health Select Committee said: “I can confirm that Rethink has indeed approached the Health Select Committee asking for a public inquiry and I very much support the idea”.

Rethink chief executive Cliff Prior said: “Government should concentrate on the real and specific mental health dangers, not general warnings that no-one takes seriously. There's a clear need for more research in this area. We believe a health select committee inquiry is needed to help establish the facts about the link between cannabis and psychosis”.

Mr Prior added: “Reclassification has sent out a mixed and confusing message. There is a strongly-held view that cannabis is risk-free, reflected in the rates of its use among young people.

“Cannabis is not risk free. We have known for years that using cannabis makes the symptoms of schizophrenia far worse in people who already have the illness. There is a rapidly growing body of evidence showing that cannabis can trigger schizophrenia in people already at risk – and probably even in people who should only be low risk”.

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Saturday, 29 January 2005 10:19
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Aesthetic fillers may carry vCJD risk
Sir Liam Donaldson, the Chief Medical Officer, has called for a government body to investigate whether "aesthetic fillers" used in cosmetic surgery clinics could transmit variant vCJD the human form of “mad cow” disease or other infections to patients.

Tsar Harry Cayton, who chairs the Expert Group on the Regulation of Cosmetic Surgery said “raised concerns about injections administered to raise cheek bones or otherwise improve the appearance of the face. Some are synthetic but others might contain human tissue or tissue from animals or birds”.

The report said that biodegradable fillers had a good record, but that "semi-permanent and permanent fillers have been reported to produce significant, longer-term inflammatory reactions in the skin, leading to discomfort, scarring and disfigurement".

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Saturday, 29 January 2005 09:45
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
cosmetic surgery hit with vanity tax
Senators from the United States of America are considering a “vanity tax" for patients who want cosmetic surgery.

The Washington state senator who proposed the tax wants to earmark the money for children's health insurance.

The idea has angered plastic surgeons but supporters, such as Seattle senator Karen Keiser, argue those who can afford surgery can afford the tax.

The introduction of a 6.5% vanity tax is being considered in Washington and Illinois. But the tax would not apply to reconstructive surgery.
   

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Friday, 28 January 2005 16:35
BNN: British Nursing News Online · www.bnn-online.co.uk
Parents Lose Court Bid
The parents of baby Charlotte Wyatt have lost the court order giving doctors permission not to resuscitate her if she stops breathing.

Darren Wyatt, 33, and wife Debbie, 23, of Portsmouth, must now bring evidence to a further hearing on the future of 15-month-old Charlotte.

The judge said he was "delighted" by the improvements observed in 15-month-old Charlotte since he granted doctors a declaration last October.

"Nobody who knows this case can derive anything other than pleasure from that," he said.

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